As it turns out, Estonian seems absolutely high-larious if you’re an English speaker. For example, the word pood means shop in Estonia, leading to some “i couldn’t make this up if I tried” signs. Like this one…

Not only is there pood, there's also tuba.

Not only is there pood, there’s also tuba.

And also this one…

Geoff: "I didn't realize souvenirs could do that."

Geoff: “I didn’t realize souvenirs could do that.”

And because third time’s a charm:

Bleh, Katie, why do you have to be so disgusting all the time?

Bleh, Katie, why do you have to be so disgusting all the time?

It isn’t just “pood,” either. There are other Estonian words and phrases that reduced my five-year-old brain to fits of giggles. Like this

"Geoff, get back here. You DO NOT want to go that way!"

“Geoff, get back here. You DO NOT want to go that way!”

And also this

I thought that was only legal in Amsterdam.

I thought that was only legal in Amsterdam.

Finally, Estonian also has a wonderful overabundance of vowels, which leads to movies like “Ice Age 3” being translated like this:

And Jaaaeg to you, too, fine sir!

And Jaaaeg to you, too, fine sir!

So there you have it. Estonian is AWESOME!